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Prepare for an RFP in 4 Steps

As a large-scale shipper, you use a request for proposal (RFP) to put freight out for bid, typically on an annual basis, correct? You are smart. This process helps keep your current freight providers on their game and gives you the opportunity to evaluate the capability of newcomers. Here are four steps that will have you well-prepared for your RFP process:

1. Get Organized

Details. And lots of them. That is the basis of a good RFP. The homework you need to do is not only for the sake of line items in the RFP but also for the alignment of your internal team. You need to work together to define the ideal outcome of the process. Once you are in lockstep regarding what a successful RFP looks like, there will be numerous facts to gather and decisions to make. You should get a jump start on these:

  • Know your annual freight spend and volume
    • When you can, break your spend out by mode. This will help pinpoint your savings potential and give you data to measure against.
  • Profile your freight in detail
    • The particulars will help freight providers create tailored solutions for you. Document your freight’s handling requirements, load time, standard weights, pickup and delivery times. Providers will also want to know if you have driver-friendly facilities and how quickly you pay. It is also beneficial to document the efficiency of your check-in and check-out process.
  • Outline the full objectives of your RFP in your clear and concise bid package
    • This is where you define your expectations for the RFP. What do you hope to achieve? Freight services want to provide the information you are looking for. This will help both your organization and those invited to bid to act with intention throughout the process.  
  • Set the number of bid rounds
    • The number of rounds in the RFP process helps those bidding understand your communication cadence and informs their own strategy in regard to winning your business.

Pro tip! Gather visuals of the products you ship. Part of your job is to make your freight attractive to the service provider. They need to want to move your freight.

2. Determine the Participants

Your carrier strategy likely includes a mix of carriers and third-party logistics companies (3PLs) — small, large, national, regional. The tender percentage awarded to each is deliberate and likely based on the requirements of your freight. Bring this same thought process as you determine the invite list of your RFP. You want a good mix to help you thrive in a changing logistics landscape. Balance this group based on fit with your supply chain operations.

The RFP process is the perfect opportunity to evaluate your incumbent shipping services against potential new providers — how they compare on rates as well as overall fit in your strategy. Remember, these partners can make a large impact on how customers view your reliability. So, once you have your carrier mix determined, go ahead and prepare your list of hard-hitting questions:

  • How does our freight fit into your network?
  • Where will we rank among your clients in freight spend?
  • Are we aligned on KPIs?
  • Have you done X before?
    • Whatever your freight requires, make sure they have handled that situation in the past.

3. Establish a Benchmark

To determine your RFPs success, you have to know if it helped you hit your established goals. So, you need a baseline for comparison. There are a few ways you can accomplish this:

  • Gather historical data from your company
  • Reach out to industry trade associations that may share their knowledge
  • Work with an outside consultant

As you are compiling this data, be on the lookout for opportunities to optimize your transportation program. Maybe your RFP should consider modal conversion or the opportunities for lane aggregation.  

After a set time, once your new RFP is in place, look at the numbers in comparison to your baseline. Are they trending in the manner you had hoped? Preparing for measurement and analysis is a plan for success.

4. Outline RFP Administration

You will need to create a system of checks and balances for the RFP process to help secure the best outcome for your business. Define the communication pattern so you have a game plan to reach out to the participants after each round. We also advise an open line of communication with carriers and providers throughout the course of the RFP.

Pro tip! Do not provide target rates in your initial RFP. It could adversely impact the results and cause you to overlook providers that are a great fit with your operations.

After the RFP Process

You prepared and administered your RFP. Now what? Once your freight has been awarded, there is still more to do to get the trucks rolling. Onboarding calls are very important to make sure you are on the same page with each provider regarding service levels and volume commitments. You put a significant amount of your time and energy into the RFP, work to make sure it was worth the investment.

3PLs are a vital part of success in most supply chains. Your carrier strategy likely endorses a mix of 3PLs and asset-based carriers. We provide the value of strategy and solution that only a 3PL can. If our networks compliment one another, we will be a trusted resource to help your company succeed in hitting the goals of your RFP and beyond.

Submit your RFP to inquiry@agforcets.com.

 

National Truck Driver Appreciation Week and Beyond — Thank a Truck Driver

From the alarm clock you snooze in the morning to the TV you Netflix and chill with at night, it’s likely you have a truck driver to thank for making all the things you need, want and enjoy in your life accessible. We appreciate our driver partners every day, and we love the spotlight they enjoy during National Truck Driver Appreciation Week. It is a great time to reflect on all they do to keep our nation connected.

Let’s take a minute to explore the importance of truck drivers. They are undoubtedly the center of the freight industry, making it possible to move goods from here to there. Could they also be the hub of our general society? Think about the important institutions that would have trouble obtaining resources without truck drivers, like hospitals or prisons.

In an article by TruckerPlanet.net, they consider a world sans drivers. Their article states in the first 24 hours without truck drivers hospital, service station, and manufacturing operations would be impacted, as well as food supply. In the days that follow, supplies would become scarce and food shortage would be a concern — not to mention waste build up. Imagining this scenario makes it quite easy to give thanks to the men and women that help keep us cared for and fed.

It also shows just how important the trucking industry is to our national economy, contributing nearly $739 billion in revenue a year. About 70 percent of all freight tonnage is transported by truck, and 80 percent of U.S. communities are supplied by trucking deliveries.

There are currently 15.5 million trucks in operation traveling more than four million miles of roads. We imagined a world without drivers, but even a drop in the number of truckers on the road would have significant consequences. It would almost immediately translate to slower delivery times and higher priced goods.

Truck Driving is Hard

Let’s not forget what truck drivers give up to help us stay connected and productive, starting with the time they spend away from family and friends. Driving about 125,000 miles a year, they may have around 3 weeks between nights in their own bed.

In addition, a truck driver’s health can suffer. Over the road drivers may not have a lot of choice when it comes to healthy food selection, and sitting for long periods of time is not good for anyone. Seeing a doctor or health care professional in general can be a challenge for truck drivers with their schedules allowing for limited time at home.

And how can we not mention the dangers drivers face on the road itself? We need our drivers safe. That is easier said than done when you’re hauling 45,000 pounds or more during rush hour in Chicago, in the dark of night around sharp corners, or in frigid conditions while snow starts to accumulate. That is more than most of us would be willing to put on the line. It takes a lot of skill to navigate the roads in a truck.

Showing Appreciation

Long story short, drivers do more for us in our everyday life than what is typically recognized. From keeping gas in the stations to apples in the store, they keep us connected to the goods we cannot live without – often at a cost to their personal lives. With that in mind, let’s remember to thank our hardworking truck drivers during National Driver Appreciation Week, and every day that follows. They truly deserve respect and appreciation for the work they do to keep our country moving.

Together, we can simplify logistics. Contact us today for a free consultation. Give us a call at 844.713.6723 or email us at inquiry@agforcets.com.